March 28, 2017

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  • In Pictures: At Palace, masses demand Morsi’s removal

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    CAIRO: In an unprecedented scene of mass mobilization in front of the Ittihadiya Presidential Palace, tens of thousands of protesters gathered to chant in unison against Egypt’s first freely elected president as he barely completes one year in office. Spurred by a three-month old grassroots signature campaign, Tamarod, which demanded a withdrawal of confidence from President Morsi, ho hails from the Muslim Brotherhood, and holding early elections, Egyptians flooded squares all over the country, in what some say are protests that far exceeded their counterparts in 2011. Across the city in Tahrir Square, tens of thousands were making similar demands,…

    In Pictures: Selections from Tahrir, Ittihadiya, Nasr City

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    CAIRO – On the last Friday before planned June 30 mass rallies called for by grassroots Tamarod (Rebellion) campaign demanding early presidential elections, pro and anti-Morsi protestors flexed their muscles with coordinated street action across the nation. In Tahrir Square, where throngs of anti-Morsi protesters converged and have started a sit-in, and in Nasr City at Rabaa El Adaweyya Mosque Square, where their opponents congregated in the tens of thousands, the day went by in peace. But parallel protests in Alexandria, where two were killed during clashes between both sides – one of them and American who was stabbed to death…

    Op-ed: The role of religion in politics

    Screen grab shows Turkish PM Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaking in Cairo mid-November.

    BY HISHAM EZZ EL-ARAB What can Egypt learn from Turkey? (Part I) A common phrase in Turkey, where I have been living for the past three years, is ‘yavash, yavash.’ In English it means ‘slowly, slowly,’ and in Arabic ‘shwaye, shwaye’. It is often used in conversations about Turkey’s political transitions, which have been as massive and unexpected as those in Egypt over the past century. The popular election of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party to a parliamentary majority, along with the unexpected success of Salafi parties, then the success of Dr. Mohamed Morsy in the presidential elections,…

    Compromise and the revolution

    Screen grab of President Mohamed Morsi's historic first speech addressing the nation.

    BY NOUR BAKR At its height, the defining mantra of Egypt’s tumultuous uprising was the famous cry “the people want the fall of the regime.” That the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), along with many remnants of the Mubarak era remain key players in the country’s politics is widely held as proof that the revolution ultimately failed. Whilst partially true, the electoral successes of the Muslim Brotherhood do not, as many have argued, completely betray the ultimate aim of the uprising. Rather the successive victories of Mohamed Morsi and the FJP signify the triumph of a compromise on…

    Morsi haunted by MB despite resignation

    File photo of President Mohamed Morsi giving a speech in Tahrir Square after winning the elections in June 2012..

    BY HEBA HESHAM Cairo: Despite his resignation from the Muslim Brotherhood and its political arm, the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), President Mohamed Morsi remains haunted by the group. Skeptics claim his authorities as president will be restricted by his “subordination” to them. When he was named Egypt’s new president, Morsi’s electoral campaign announced that he resigned from his position in the Guidance Bureau of the Muslim Brotherhood and as chief of the FJP, a promise he had made as a gesture of goodwill. While Morsi was not obliged to do that, the gesture was necessary to restore trust in…

    How Egypt’s Islamists lost the first round

    Rival presidential candidates Mohammed Morsi (L) and Ahmed Shafik.

    BY RANIA AL MALKY Cairo: Let’s do the math. According to the preliminary results of Egypt’s presidential poll, the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) candidate Mohammed Morsi picked up 5,578,760 votes, around 25 percent, followed by Mubarak-era minister and PM Ahmed Shafik with 5,333,84, 24 percent. In a surprise showing, Nasserist Hamdeen Sabahi was next with 4,670,939 votes, 21 percent. Trailing were two former leading candidates, ex-Muslim Brotherhood leader Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh with 3,919,727, 18 percent, and in a distant fifth place, former Arab League secretary general and Mubarak-era Foreign Minister Amr Moussa at 2,391,214, or 11…

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