April 23, 2014

Why I’m voting

Outside the Constitutional Court on Thursday, protesters waited for an "expected" verdict. (Photo by Sarah El Sirgany)

BY SARAH EL SIRGANY Cairo: When the results of the first round were announced, the choice was clear for me. It wasn’t difficult. In case of a runoff between a representative of the Mubarak regime and another candidate, then I’m choosing the latter. No brainer. Ahmed Shafik is an ex-air force commander, a long-time civil aviation minister under Hosni Mubarak and the last prime minister appointed by the ousted president in a theatrical attempt to appease the masses in January 2011. His incompetence as prime minister — showcased in his inability for over a month to do any of the…

Detained activists released

The scorching heat didn't deter women from lining up to cast their vote at Almaza School.

BY SAFAA ABDOUN Cairo: Reports of the arrest of activists and journalists marred the first day of Egypt’s contentious presidential election runoff pitting ex-regime icon Ahmed Shafik against the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi. According to Mahmoud Afify, official spokesman of the April 6 Youth Movement, 30 members of the group were arrested near polling stations in Cairo, Giza, Alexandria, Minya and Beheira but were released by the prosecutor several hours later. “They were standing in front of the polling stations carrying the pictures of the martyrs to remind people of those who gave up their lives for Egypt,” said Afify….

Boycott or white vote?

BY FARAH SAAFAN Cairo: With the results of the first round, Egyptians found themselves trapped in what was dubbed “the worst case scenario”. Choosing between Mubarak’s last Prime Minister Ahmed Shafik and the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate Mohamed Morsi. The third option for many was to either boycott or invalidate their votes. If you can’t see the video, please click here.  

Voters look for third option

Screen grab from the boycott campaign video says "I refuse," urging Egyptians to go on mass protests instead of voting.

BY MAI SHAMS EL-DIN Cairo: Many Egyptians find themselves caught between a rock and a hard place in the first post-Mubarak presidential election. This political and moral dilemma of having to choose between an icon of the ousted regime and the Muslim Brotherhood candidate has boosted boycott calls as a viable third option. Former air force commander and Mubarak’s last prime minister Ahmed Shafik is slated to face off with the Freedom and Justice Party’s Mohamed Morsi in the June 16-17 runoff. Egyptians abroad have already started voting. The candidates embody the two extremes of a polarized political sphere. Shafik…