March 20, 2019

  • 2014 jordan 3
  • Jordan cheap sale
  • Jordan fire red
  • 2014 jordan 3
  • Jordan cheap sale
  • Jordan fire red
  • Politics seeps into labor movement

    BY SARAH EL SIRGANY Cairo: Workers on strike at the Cleopatra Ceramics Factory last Thursday weren’t only demanding  their rights, they were also chanting for Egypt’s newly elected Islamist president. For some, the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi represents the other side: a man who can defend their interests in the face of a factory owner long associated with the Mubarak regime. In the Suez and Tenth of Ramadan City facilities, some workers saw their dispute as symbolic of the political struggle gripping the country today. The old regime with its intertwined web of business and politics, represented by factory owner…

    Read More

    Copts pave the road ahead

    BY MAI SHAMS EL-DIN Cairo: “It saddens me to be asked to protect Coptic rights,” President Mohamed Morsi told a delegation of clergymen in the presidential palace soon after he was elected the country’s first civilian president. But the gesture did little to quell the Coptic community’s fears. After Morsi’s victory over Mubarak’s last prime minister Ahmed Shafik, who arguably garnered most of the Coptic vote, fears of the dominance of the Muslim Brotherhood group to which Morsi belongs are mounting among Egypt’s Copts. To many observers, the Coptic community emerged more as an organized and politicized force than a…

    Read More

    Women unconcerned with Sharia

    BY DALIA RABIE Cairo: At a time when a newly elected Islamist president is seen as a direct threat to women’s rights, a recent poll showed that Egyptian women are as likely as men to favor Sharia as a source of legislation, stating that their top concerns are rather economic and social development as well as security. Forty-four percent of women said they want Sharia as a source of new legislation, compared to 50 percent of men. While 38 percent of women said they prefer it to be a source of legislation, but not the main one, compared to 37…

    Read More

    Sharqiya turns against MB

    BY SAFAA ABDOUN Sharqiya: For the residents of Sharqiya, the presidential election is a vendetta against the Muslim Brotherhood (MB). In the first round, ex-air force commander Ahmed Shafik won the Delta province with 627,808 votes, 90,000 more than Mohamed Morsi’s 536,634 votes. Sharqiya was supposed to be an easy win for the MB’s Morsi, who served as the province’s MP in 2000-2005. While Shafik’s sweeping win stunned observers, residents of the area were unsurprised. The Freedom and Justice Party, the Brotherhood’s political arm led by Morsi, had won 18 of 30 seats in Sharqiya during the parliamentary elections just…

    Read More

    Democracy’s growing pains

    BY SAFAA ABDOUN Cairo: No sooner were the preliminary results of Egypt’s first post-Mubarak election announced, anger, attacks and accusations rippled through the streets of Egypt. Much to voters’ dismay, the results pit the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohamed Morsi against  Mubarak’s last prime minister Ahmed Shafik in a controversial face-off leading Egyptians back to Tahrir Square. The reaction puts Egyptians’ readiness for democracy into question and anticipates future conflict after the runoff results within a few days. On May 23 around 23.6 million eligible voters cast their votes in Egypt’s first election following the January 25 uprising, approximately 46 percent of…

    Read More

    Election may spur sectarian divide

    BY SAFAA ABDOUN Cairo: Egypt’s choice for president has been narrowed down to an Islamist and an ex-army general, stoking in the process potential sectarian tension. As soon as the results of round one were out, accusations were hurled on social media and across the airwaves: The Copts did it. They helped former air force commander Ahmed Shafik make it to the runoff. Their fear of Islamists led Egypt back to the arms of the Mubarak regime. As critics were blaming the Brotherhood for using mosques in electoral campaigning, the church was accused of mobilizing Egypt’s Christians, estimated to be…

    Read More

    Polling stations not accessible to all

    BY DALIA RABIE Cairo: The low turnout at the presidential election has been attributed to many factors, from the lack of faith in the electoral process to the scorching heat. But another factor that is often overlooked is the inaccessibility of polling stations to people with disabilities. Concerned parties hold the Presidential Election Committee (PEC) responsible for the failure to make polling stations accessible to people with disabilities, thus excluding a significant number of voters. There are no concrete statistics regarding the number of people with special needs in Egypt. According to some polls, they constitute around 10-12 percent of…

    Read More

    Syrian refugees tell their stories

    BY MAURICE CHAMMAH Cairo: By necessity, the work proceeds in secret. A small group of activists and refugees are collecting and distributing goods to Egypt’s growing population of Syrian refugees, who have escaped increasing violence as the Free Syrian Army battles Bashar Al-Assad’s government. “We can no longer shoulder the amount of people coming in,” they say in a statement that circulates online. “There are approximately 2,000 Syrians in Egypt that have fled the violence and the number is slowly but steadily growing.” An activist who goes by the email handle Damascus Rebel visited a handful of the Syrian refugees,…

    Read More

    2014 Retro Jordans2014 Aqua 11sair jordan Shoes