January 17, 2019

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  • What Egypt women want

    BY SAHAR AZIZ Cairo: Whether before or after the revolution, Egyptian women’s primary concern has been  the lack of economic and social development. A poll by the Gallup Center for Muslim Studies found that religion is not the most pressing concern for Arab women after the “Arab Spring.”  Rather the recent findings on Arabs’ attitudes towards women’s rights, religion, and other social issues in Muslim majority countries corroborate the notion that economic challenges take precedence over all other issues notwithstanding the historic revolutions. Nonetheless, Egyptian women’s representation in governance is starkly absent. Despite accounting for nearly a third of Egypt’s…

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    Editorial: Battle for the constitution

    BY RANIA AL MALKY Cairo: Today is a very happy day in the history of Egypt. Those who elected Morsi are happy because he won, and those who elected Shafik are happy because he won; and those who boycotted are happy because Tantawi tricked them both. Those who hate Mubarak are happy because he’s dead and those who love him are happy because he’s still alive. God bless Egyptian hashish. So went the joke, which in a few words summed up the level of chaos, polarization and disinformation suffocating Egyptians today, less than 24 hours before the Presidential Election Committee…

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    Our “nasty” revolution

    BY KHALIL AL-ANANI No matter who will be Egypt’s next president, the fact is that the military will wield power for years to come. So instead of wasting our energy in following a bogus transition, let’s celebrate our “nasty” and humiliating revolutionary spirit. Many of the so-called liberals and secularists have betrayed their liberal ethics and values by backing the military’s recent coup with the addendum to the constitutional decree. While they are fully aware of the consequences of such a coup, they chose to stand with the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF). Their panic from the Muslim…

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    A personalized revolt

    BY FARAH SAAFAN With the preliminary results of the first post-Mubarak presidential election indicating that the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate Mohamed Morsi may become our next president, Egypt’s future first lady quickly became the subject of heated debate on social networking sites. Just as Egyptians began to wonder about Morsi’s wife, Naglaa Aly, a photo of her began circulating on the internet creating a web frenzy over her “look” as a conservative Muslim who dons the Islamic Khimar, a type of veil that covers the hair and falls loosely below the chest. Aly, who in a rare interview said that she…

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    Why I’m voting

    BY SARAH EL SIRGANY Cairo: When the results of the first round were announced, the choice was clear for me. It wasn’t difficult. In case of a runoff between a representative of the Mubarak regime and another candidate, then I’m choosing the latter. No brainer. Ahmed Shafik is an ex-air force commander, a long-time civil aviation minister under Hosni Mubarak and the last prime minister appointed by the ousted president in a theatrical attempt to appease the masses in January 2011. His incompetence as prime minister — showcased in his inability for over a month to do any of the…

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    Editorial: The final chapter

    BY RANIA AL MALKY Cairo: In his hospital bed at Tora prison, Egypt’s old tyrant must be reveling in satisfaction, seeing that his legacy lives on, as he watches protégé Ahmed Shafik rise from the ashes of his regime and stick his tongue out to the “revolution.” Backed by his uniformed loyal subjects in the military council, a complicit judicial system and his son’s business cronies, Mubarak must be preparing his suitcase, ready to start a new life as an ex-president in Sharm El-Sheikh. The Supreme Constitutional Court Thursday ruled in favor of Shafik, declaring parliament’s amendments to the political…

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    Away from reactive politics

    BY FIRAS AL-ATRAQCHI Cairo: Since the January 25 popular uprising that unseated President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians from all walks of life have found their long-dormant voices, pushing the boundaries of the public space and molding civic discourse as independent media desperately tried to catch up. Some of the emerging political stars and those former stalwart NDP members who survived the “purge” were forced to follow suit, catering to the voice of the revolution. Suddenly, Egyptians were seeing the first semblance of political public relations, irrespective of how genuine the presidential candidates and their campaign responsiveness were. But in a zero sum…

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    Shafik: What’s at stake?

    BY NAEL M. SHAMA Cairo: There’s little doubt that on a personal level presidential candidate Ahmed Shafik provides his audience with many reasons that would deter them from voting for him. But the issue at stake clearly transcends the persona of Shafik, his unmasked arrogance, and his many media blunders. It rather goes into the heart of the nature, structure and alliances of the formidable Egyptian state. A little bit of history is needed here. The nation state that emerged in the Arab world after independence has exhibited a remarkable ability to reproduce itself against all odds. The numerous military…

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    Does US want democratic Egypt?

    BY SARA KHORSHID Cairo: It’s understandable that each country is entitled to pursue its national interests, and that one country’s national interest may partially conflict with that of another. But it’s difficult to comprehend how a country’s interests would be fixated around  the Middle East’s stability, and Israel’s security —  to the bitter end.Before Egypt’s January 2011 revolution, US President Barack Obama ignored calls by pro-democracy advocates against the American alliance with the ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak. But even the revolution has not been enough proof to convince American decision makers that stability under a US- and Israel-friendly, yet dictatorial…

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    Egypt’s innocent murderers

    BY OMAR ASHOUR Cairo: “Bashar should abandon power and retire safely in Egypt. The general-prosecutor is murder-friendly,” a friend, referring to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, told me as we watched former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s trial in the Police Academy’s criminal court. Although Mubarak and his interior (security) minister, Habib al-Adly, were handed life sentences at the conclusion of their trials, the generals who ran Egypt’s apparatus of repression as deputy interior ministers were acquitted. Hasan Abdel Rahman, head of the notorious, Stasi-like State Security Investigations (SSI); Ahmad Ramzi, head of the Central Security Forces (CSF); Adly Fayyid, the head…

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