January 17, 2019

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  • Gender and the Olympics

    BY FATMA EMAM The Olympics is a reminder that competition between nations need not be in the battlefield, but can be on the sports pitch, to spread tolerance and egalitarianism. And in London 2012 the blaring Olympic torch is adding another dimension: the fight against the darkness of stereotypes. The Olympics is the season of patriotism, excitement and the show of human capability. It is also a platform that reveals the social, cultural and political dynamics of the world. Politics is unavoidable, such as in incidents like the refusal of Tunisian fencer Sara Besbses to compete against her Israeli counterpart….

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    The power of education

    BY REHAM BARAKAT The power cut in Heliopolis over the past few days, which is a negative thing, strangely left me with a positive thought. It reminded me of 16-year-old Egyptian Azza Abdel Hamid. She was the winner of the 2011 European Union contest for young scientists who discovered a way to turn plastic into biofuel. Yes, I thought, maybe a generation of young Egyptians will conjure up positive and effective solutions for alternative energy that will help plunge Egypt into a more progressive and environmentally-friendly future where we have less power outages and modern sustainable energy resources. Another example…

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    Dahshour and sectarianism

    BY KARIM MALAK The sectarian incident in Al Badrashin is a relatively low-level one. It does not measure up to the magnitude of violence that was associated with other incidents such as Al Kush’h or Zawya Al Hamra. The conflict itself was triggered by the killing of a Muslim by a Christian over a petty argument and the excessive Muslim backlash of burning Coptic shops and attacking the local church. Almost 120 Coptic families have allegedly been subjected to forced displacement. Both the government and the Church know that it’s a minor incident and this is probably why it will…

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    Compromise and the revolution

    BY NOUR BAKR At its height, the defining mantra of Egypt’s tumultuous uprising was the famous cry “the people want the fall of the regime.” That the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), along with many remnants of the Mubarak era remain key players in the country’s politics is widely held as proof that the revolution ultimately failed. Whilst partially true, the electoral successes of the Muslim Brotherhood do not, as many have argued, completely betray the ultimate aim of the uprising. Rather the successive victories of Mohamed Morsi and the FJP signify the triumph of a compromise on…

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    What’s your label?

    BY REHAM BARAKAT I drove to the club with my exercise partner and walked in silence until our routine was interrupted by a pleasant lady who asked if she could join us to improve her pace. We immediately engaged in a very enjoyable conversation, discovering mutual interests, ideas and outlooks, and then she left. My friend then turned and said, “That lady is really nice but she’s obviously very different. Typical Egyptians don’t normally approach each other that comfortably.” For some reason I found myself agreeing with her, as though there was a silent rule as to what “typical Egyptian”…

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    First police victim under Morsi

    BY NOOV SENARY Roza Shaath is a 58-year-old mother. In the early hours of June 21, a unit from the Damanhour Police Station raided her home and arrested her son, Ahmed El-Fetiani, against whom the court had ruled in absentia in favor of a debtor. Ahmed was taken to the police car. When Mrs. Shaath tried to ask why her son was arrested as she stood in front of the car, officer Ahmed El-Zaafrany ordered the conscript driving to run her over, which he did before racing away from the scene. Mrs. Shaath died instantly and her body was moved…

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    The Nubian challenge

    BY FATMA EMAM Nubia is my homeland. It is the heritage, culture and language that I belong to but hardly know. It is part of my multiple identity, one that springs from a deep rooted civilization that is a source of pride for me, inextricably linking me to my ancestors. Yet the joy of being Nubian is tainted by an equal share of agony. I write this at a special moment in Egypt’s history and the Nubian community, as the nation embarks on the second republic and attempts to shake off the ugly legacy of the first one; a legacy…

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    Please respect my privacy

    BY REHAM BARAKAT Recently, I saw a status on Facebook that resonated well with me. It said: Religion is private. I clicked the Like button and wished that more people believed in this sophisticated, non-judgmental, apolitical statement about religion. This was exacerbated even more after the supposedly religiously incited Suez incident, which took place at the beginning of this month. The story goes that a 20-year-old engineering student named Ahmed Said was stabbed to death in Suez allegedly by bearded men, while he was walking with his fiance. Media reported that, according to eyewitnesses, Said was attacked by three men…

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    Higgs and Egypt’s revolution

    BY WAEL AFIFI Bread, liberty and dignity are the noble unifying goals of the revolution. As the daily political struggles continue to refine, define and often improvise on the shape and the numerous components of these goals, I would like to throw into this mix the tool of scientific literacy.Defined as “an evolving combination of science-related attitudes, skills and knowledge,” it’s important to stress that scientific literacy isn’t an elitist concept.While it is true that combating poverty, illiteracy, disease, and other societal and political ills that plague our country remain the foundation of any revolutionary thinking; it is also true that…

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    Editorial: Egypt’s two presidents

    BY RANIA AL MALKY The election of Egypt’s first democratically chosen president since the beginning of history, Mohamed Morsi, was a dramatic overturning of this country’s political traditions in more ways than one. Morsi is neither the closest male descendant of the last Pharoah, nor the god of choice of the royal priests; nor does he hail from the Mohamed Ali dynasty or from the “superior breed” of military men who overthrew its last monarch. Most of all, he is possibly the only president on earth, not just in Egypt, who has publicly taken the oath of office three times….

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