January 18, 2019

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  • Op-ed: Bring Back Egypt’s Elected Government

    BY JEFFREY D. SACHS New York – Putting an end to Egypt’s deepening polarization and rising bloodshed requires one urgent first step: the reinstatement of Mohamed Morsi as Egypt’s duly elected president. His removal by military coup was unjustified. While it is true that millions of demonstrators opposed Morsi’s rule, even massive street protests do not constitute a valid case for a military coup in the name of the “people” when election results repeatedly say otherwise. There is no doubt that Egyptian society is deeply divided along sectarian, ideological, class, and regional lines. Yet the country has gone to the polls…

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    Op-ed: Egypt on the Brink

    BY JAMES M. DORESY – Events in Cairo presage a return to the situation under ousted President Hosni Mubarak that prompted millions of Egyptians to camp out on Cairo’s Tahrir Square two years ago  until the military forced him to step down after 30 years in office. However little in the drama currently unfolding harks back to the demands put forward by the protesters in 2011: an end to the police state, greater political freedom, respect for human rights, an end to corruption, and justice and dignity. Egypt was seemingly united when Mubarak was ousted and the mass demonstrations were singularly…

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    Op-ed: Revolution redux and the return of Thomas Friedman

    BY ALI HAZZAH Hello, again. You know me.  I’m the same well-fed, well-traveled guy who has worked for the same rich American publication for the last thirty years.   But that’s not important, because I travel a lot in the Moslem world, and  I’m not like most Americans.  I know the Arab street.  And I’m going to tell what’s actually happening in Egypt right now. The other day, for example, the week in fact that President Morsi became ex President Morsi, I was trying to get a taxi from the 26 of July Street in Zamalek, on the street corner right in…

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    Op-ed: Here’s to Egypt

    BY REHAM BARAKAT Cairo – “It’s a coup.” “No, it is not, it is a revolution of the people.” “Alright, let’s call it a soft coup.” “Not even, it is the work of Tamarod and the people and the army only stepped in to meet their demands.” This is an example of the revolving, dizzying dialogue that is now flooding traditional and social media and conversations in the street following the spectacular ousting of President Morsi from power in Egypt. After three days of unprecedented protests across the nation denouncing the legitimacy of now ex-President Morsi and demanding early presidential…

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    Editorial: Paved with good intentions

      BY RANIA AL MALKY Cairo – As Egypt sprints along the road to hell, the military-installed interim President Adli Mansour, chief justice of the Supreme Constitutional Court, took the oath of office yesterday, praising the army’s intervention so that Egypt could “correct the path of its glorious revolution.”  Outside the venerable halls of officialdom, an utter scene of chaos, schizophrenia and repression. The swift popularly-backed military coup that removed Mohamed Morsi, Egypt’s first freely elected civilian president, on the first anniversary of his term, began an equally swift reconstruction of a murderous regime that the Egyptian masses rose up…

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    Op-ed: Bleeding democracy

    BY REHAM BARAKAT Cairo – My morning today was spent looking up the official definition of the word democracy, not because I don’t know what it means, but I wanted to be sure that I was working with the official version of it. Naturally because there is more than one dictionary, I couldn’t find one unified definition of this much reiterated, almost sacred word. Nonetheless, the gist of what I found is that democracy is the “government of the people” and “rule by the majority” through “elections” or “elected representatives.” The reason why I was so eager to search for…

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    Op-ed: Full FB post by Essam El Haddad

    CAIRO- Below is the full text of a Facebook post by Essam El Haddad, Assistant to the President on Foreign Relations & International Cooperation. BY ESSAM EL HADDAD – As I write these lines I am fully aware that these may be the last lines I get to post on this page. For the sake of Egypt and for historical accuracy, let’s call what is happening by its real name: Military coup. It has been two and a half years after a popular revolution against a dictatorship that had strangled and drained Egypt for 30 years. That revolution restored a sense…

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    Op-ed: For a Better Tomorrow

    BY REHAM BARAKAT Cairo- I live very close to the Presidential Palace, in fact a five minute walk and I am easily within the vicinity. I have been observing the developments in the area as the entire nation anxiously awaits the planned mass protest of June 30. Rumors have been spreading that all roads that lead to the Palace would be sealed off with electric fences but for now none of this has taken place. The only obvious development is the usual sealing off of this symbolic building with very large concrete stones so that no one can actually get…

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    Editorial: No Method in Egypt’s Madness

    BY RANIA AL MALKY Cairo – This is it. Less than 12 hours to go before the moment of truth. It is possible that the future of Egypt’s incomplete revolution will be decided by the events of June 30, the day set by grassroots Tamarod campaign to lead mass protests to withdraw confidence from Egypt’s first freely elected civilian president, and demand early elections one year into his term. At a rather chaotic press conference by the Tamarod leaders on the eve of zero hour, one of their many spokesmen claimed the petition had collected over 22 million signatures nationwide and…

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    Op-ed: Tunisia’s Islamic Wild Card

    BY ISHAC DIWAN AND HEDI LARBI TUNIS – Can political Islam be a constructive player in a truly democratic system? Tunisia is currently trying to answer that question – with implications that extend to the entire Arab world. Indeed, given that no Islamist party has ever governed democratically in an Arab country, Tunisia (together with Egypt) is undertaking an historic experiment. Several factors improve Tunisia’s chances of achieving a successful democratic transition. There is, for example, the country’s large and educated middle class and the historical moderation of Ez-Zitouna University, one of the oldest universities of Islamic theology. Moreover, an…

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