July 25, 2017

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  • In Pictures: At Palace, masses demand Morsi’s removal

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    CAIRO: In an unprecedented scene of mass mobilization in front of the Ittihadiya Presidential Palace, tens of thousands of protesters gathered to chant in unison against Egypt’s first freely elected president as he barely completes one year in office. Spurred by a three-month old grassroots signature campaign, Tamarod, which demanded a withdrawal of confidence from President Morsi, ho hails from the Muslim Brotherhood, and holding early elections, Egyptians flooded squares all over the country, in what some say are protests that far exceeded their counterparts in 2011. Across the city in Tahrir Square, tens of thousands were making similar demands,…

    In Pictures: Phenomenal numbers flood into Tahrir Square

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    CAIRO – In a scene reminiscent of the 18 days of the January 2011 uprising, Tahrir Square, the epicenter of protests that ousted Egypt’s 30-year dictator Mubarak only two and a half years ago, has once more been transformed into a hotbed of protest action. Tens of thousands descended upon the iconic city center demanding the removal of President Morsi, whose single year in office has been fraught with consistent power and fuel crises, rising prices and unprecedented political polarization. All photos by Hassan Ibrahim. Powered by Cincopa Video Hosting.

    In Pictures: Thousands at Nasr City protest

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    CAIRO – A mostly Islamist protest supporting President Morsi and rejecting calls for his removal and early elections was on high alert. Groups of young men wore protective helmets and even bulletproof vests in anticipation of a possible attack on them by who they referred to as the “NDP thugs” hired by the remnants of the ousted regime. Photos by Hassan Ibrahim Powered by Cincopa Video Hosting.

    In Pictures: Calm in Ittihadiya as protesters file in

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    CAIRO – The vicinity of Ittihadiya Palace, the official seat of the presidency in Cairo’s Heliopolis neighborhood, was calm as anti-Morsi protesters slowly filed in to prepare for what many have dubbed a decisive day in Egypt’s troubled transition to democracy. In the meantime the President has moved to Kobba Palace, according to a foreign press center circular inviting correspondents to a 5 pm press conference. For weeks, grassroots anti-Morsi campaign Tamarod has been gearing up for this day where they plan to demand President Morsi’s resignation and early elections, backed by their alleged collection of over 22 million signatures…

    Op-ed: For a Better Tomorrow

    Is it the calm before the storm? A few tents are pitched outside Ittihadiya presidential palace one day before planned protests demanding early elections and the removal of President Morsi. (Photo by Hassan Ibrahim)

    BY REHAM BARAKAT Cairo- I live very close to the Presidential Palace, in fact a five minute walk and I am easily within the vicinity. I have been observing the developments in the area as the entire nation anxiously awaits the planned mass protest of June 30. Rumors have been spreading that all roads that lead to the Palace would be sealed off with electric fences but for now none of this has taken place. The only obvious development is the usual sealing off of this symbolic building with very large concrete stones so that no one can actually get…

    Editorial: No Method in Egypt’s Madness

    Anti-Morsi protesters in Tahrir Square Friday hold a banner saying "Leave Morsi." (Photo by Hassan Ibrahim)

    BY RANIA AL MALKY Cairo – This is it. Less than 12 hours to go before the moment of truth. It is possible that the future of Egypt’s incomplete revolution will be decided by the events of June 30, the day set by grassroots Tamarod campaign to lead mass protests to withdraw confidence from Egypt’s first freely elected civilian president, and demand early elections one year into his term. At a rather chaotic press conference by the Tamarod leaders on the eve of zero hour, one of their many spokesmen claimed the petition had collected over 22 million signatures nationwide and…

    The real Hassan Shehata, Egypt’s slain Shia Sheikh

    Screen grab from amateur video shows men dragging the body of one of four killed during a mob attack on a Shia gathering in Abu Nomros, Abu Musallam village in Giza.

    BY AMRO HASSAN Cairo – “He was a swindler who regularly held superstitious ceremonies. I don’t know who exactly attacked and killed him, but God bless whoever dispensed us of [Hassan] Shehata,” Amina Saad, a resident of the Giza village of Abu Musallam describes the dramatic killing of Shia leader Hassan Shehata, his brother and two fellow Shia at the hands of an angry mob earlier this week. Fathi Sallam, a shop owner in the area, said that he frequently came to their area and that they often heard that he sponsored group and swinger sex gatherings attended by Shia…

    In Pictures: Selections from Tahrir, Ittihadiya, Nasr City

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    CAIRO – On the last Friday before planned June 30 mass rallies called for by grassroots Tamarod (Rebellion) campaign demanding early presidential elections, pro and anti-Morsi protestors flexed their muscles with coordinated street action across the nation. In Tahrir Square, where throngs of anti-Morsi protesters converged and have started a sit-in, and in Nasr City at Rabaa El Adaweyya Mosque Square, where their opponents congregated in the tens of thousands, the day went by in peace. But parallel protests in Alexandria, where two were killed during clashes between both sides – one of them and American who was stabbed to death…

    Is Egypt approaching revolution redux?

    Graffiti on Mohamed Mahmoud Street just off Cairo's iconic Tahrir Square in memory of the martyrs of the January revolution.

    BY AMRO HASSAN Cairo – Hassan Abdel Salam quietly sweeps the floor outside his humble hardware shop at the infamous Mohamed Mahmoud Street overlooking Tahrir Square. The 68-year-old has been around for over 50 years, but like many of his neighbors, he has never witnessed anything more exciting, hopeful, frightening and threatening than the events of the past 30 months. The walls behind his tiny store are decorated with graffiti images of those who died there and elsewhere across the nation. He takes a profound look at some of their faces as he expresses overwhelming anxiety over what the near…

    Op-ed: Tunisia’s Islamic Wild Card

    Screen grab shows Ennahda Party leader Rachid El Ghannouchi speaks during the Islamist party's first public congress in Tunisia. The previous eight National conferences were held either in secret or in exile.

    BY ISHAC DIWAN AND HEDI LARBI TUNIS – Can political Islam be a constructive player in a truly democratic system? Tunisia is currently trying to answer that question – with implications that extend to the entire Arab world. Indeed, given that no Islamist party has ever governed democratically in an Arab country, Tunisia (together with Egypt) is undertaking an historic experiment. Several factors improve Tunisia’s chances of achieving a successful democratic transition. There is, for example, the country’s large and educated middle class and the historical moderation of Ez-Zitouna University, one of the oldest universities of Islamic theology. Moreover, an…

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